foodie

Adventures in Michigan: Holland, Saugatuck, and Grand Rapids

Ah, vacation season! You've finally arrived!

Andrew and I have been calling 2018 "Do Everything Year," because we are literally doing all the things. We're (mostly) out of the ickiness that characterized the early part of our marriage. We're pre-kids. We're young and our expenses are manageable. No time like the present, right?

In planning our 2018 getaways, we didn't fully consider the big picture in regards to scheduling. Our vacations were scheduled for late June/early July, late August, and mid September. So for the first half of the year, we waited and waited and waited to get to this point! Now that we're finally here, we basically get to party for 3 months. Birthday Month (August) and Love Month (September) are already month-long celebrations in our family, and now we get to add Vacation Season into the mix! HUZZAH!

Our first vacation was a family trip to Western Michigan with Andrew's immediate family, coordinated by the world's best in-laws. Seriously, friends, I won the lottery when I married an incredible man, and as a bonus, he came with delightful parents. They sought out the family lodgings, and we ended up staying on the north side of Holland in a big lake-side vacation rental. 

The views were glorious.

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Also, this was our first trip with our brand new mirrorless camera, and thus we have even more photos than we would usually have of said glorious views!

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We happened to be vacationing in a heat wave, which is unusual for the Holland area. Temps were in the 90s most of the time, and the house didn't have AC outside of a spare window unit or two. Eeek! Regardless, we managed to have a lovely time, enjoy the scenery, and explore the surprisingly abundant offerings of Holland, Saugatuck, and Grand Rapids. 

Holland, Michigan

If you like to be on the water, Holland is for you. There are plenty of opportunities to get active out on Lake Macatawa: paddle boarding, jet skiing, boating, tubing, and fishing to name a few. And just down the road, you can go to the beach and pretend you're looking at the ocean. Lake Michigan is certainly big enough to mimic a coastal beach environment! There are ice cream stands, hot dog shacks, and everything you might expect to find in close proximity to a beach. We enjoyed walking down to the General Store for some seriously yummy--albeit melty--ice cream with cousins and kids in tow.

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Alas, Andrew and I aren't beach people. I don't like being hot, and water creatures freak me out. Andrew also hates being hot, and prefers to be more active on vacation. But even with the beach and water activities out the window, we were not at a loss for things to do and see in Holland. The farmer's market is impressive, packed with great local produce and a surprising number of vendors. The downtown area is charming, lined with fun shops and restaurants in a compact, walkable area.

Our favorite downtown Holland find was Cherry Republic, a regional store connected with a farm that sells a bunch of products inspired by Andrew's favorite fruit. The original cherry salsa is a game-changer, and if you don't believe me, you can taste-test it in the retail store along with many other delectable goods like chocolate covered cherries, cherry barbecue sauce, and yes, cherry wines. But back to the salsa. Buy the salsa. Buy a jar, then buy a second and third jar to hide from your loved ones, because this stuff won't last long! 

By divine intervention, a delicious Dutch bakery had a location right down the road from our vacation rental, and people. Listen. The cake donuts and muffins were phenomenal. Ignore the regular donuts, they were mediocre. But the cake donuts and the muffins in flavors like lemon pistashio, cranberry orange, raspberry...oh goodness. I'm drooling. In fact, they were so good that I have zero photos to evidence the pastry feasting that occurred on multiple occasions. We ate them too quickly to even stop and consider taking a picture. Just go to Deboer Bakkerij and try the goodies for yourself. They also offer a full sit-down breakfast menu!

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The Dutch influence in Holland is hard to miss. The city was founded by Dutch Americans, and the remnants of that history are evident today. Almost everything in Holland shuts down on Sundays, for example. The Tulip Festival is legendary, and we hope to get up north for that some day. But year-round, attractions like Nelis' Dutch Village remind you that yes, indeed, you are in a town with Dutch history, and darn it, you will immerse yourself in it!

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Dutch Village is hard to explain. It's a kid-friendly attraction plopped down in a strip mall parking lot that attempts to recreate the ambiance of an actual Dutch Village. The result is something campy and touristy, but also weirdly charming and fun for young kids. Andrew and I visited entirely because of peer pressure, and with a good deal of reluctance--Dutch Village is not our normal vacation pit stop. But regardless, we had a fun time running around with our niece and nephew. The all-inclusive entry fee is stellar because you can hop on rides as many times as you want without juggling tickets or paying per ride.

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Dutch Village also features a petting zoo, including terrified bunnies who are daily harassed by toddlers. Poor lil bunnies. They're also for sale, which means a bunny could be permanently and irrevocably abducted by a not-so-gentle toddler! I wouldn't wish that sort of life upon any of the animals present, chickens and llamas included, but the kids love the animals. And I got my bunny snuggles in, too. Here's a photo of me trying to instill a particularly frightened bunny with telepathic vibes of calm and false safety.

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So, if you're looking for a place to let the kids run wild, ride a carousel, pet a bunny, or buy a custom pair of Dutch wooden shoes with your name burned into them, there you have it! Dutch Village has the whole package.

Saugatuck, Michigan

About 15 minutes south of Holland is Saugatuck, a teeny little lakeside town with an artsy vibe and a walkable shopping/gallery district. I cannot overstate how tiny this town is. You can easily walk the full shopping area in half a day, with plenty of time to wander and peruse the goods. There were a lot of B&B's and inns scattered around the town, which left us scratching our heads. Perhaps some people do spend more than half a day in Saugatuck.

We started our morning in Saugatuck at Grow, a cafe I selected in advance thanks to good ol' Google. 

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Our breakfast was so good that we went back to the restaurant a few hours later to grab a lavender lemonade, which was also delightful. We shared the off-menu daily special (smoked fish salad with pickled eggs, crudite, and crostini) as well as the carrot cake pancakes. The pancakes were good, but the smoked fish was downright heavenly. 

The service was excellent, our particular server was attentive and knowledgable, and we had an all-around fantastic experience. In the name of review integrity, I have to tell you that the patio chairs wreaked havoc on both of our backs. We actually went to the car, retrieved our ground camp chairs, and nestled them into the patio chairs to improve the experience. Never before have I loathed a chair that much. Uncomfortable seating aside, though, we would certainly return to Grow in the future.

The rest of our morning in Saugatuck was spent wandering the shops and art galleries. We didn't find anything that we actually wanted to buy, although we nearly walked away with some goodies from American Spoon, a gourmet grocer with tempting samples available for tasting. In general, the collection of shops and galleries in Saugatuck seemed scattered and random. It was a fun little day trip experience, but not the sort of place I'd want to stay for days at a time.

We wrapped up our time in Saugatuck with a large group lunch at Coral Gables, a large restaurant with a nice waterfront patio. The menu was basic, but the food was tasty and simple dishes like a veggie wrap had creative touches that were pleasantly surprising. Traditional American diners will be pleased with the gargantuan portion sizes. 

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Oh, Grand Rapids. What an unexpected delight you were!

Long before we actually left home for vacation, Andrew and I planned a half-day date excursion into Grand Raids, an easy 35-minute drive from Holland. We originally planned to go the botanical gardens, but it was a zillion degrees, so we opted for an indoor eating marathon instead. 

Our Google research helped us to hone in on the East Hills neighborhood for an afternoon and evening of foodie heaven. The neighborhood was lovely, walkable, and home to some of truly fantastic culinary finds.

We started the afternoon with a late lunch at The Electric Cheetah. This restaurant is officially my dining establishment spirit animal.

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For starters, the entire menu is Hamilton-themed, and bursting with so many references that I photographed the whole dang thing in stupid amounts of detail. 

Exhibit A:

Work! 

The kitchen specializes in craft root beer and mac and cheese. I mean, who came up with that combination? Weirdly, it works. We sampled two varieties of root beer and ordered "The Brothers Mac and Cheese Plate" per our server's thorough recommendation. Everything we consumed was magic, particularly the mac and cheese. 

In case you aren't sold yet, there's an unexplained Karate Kid reference on the back wall of the restaurant.

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And because the owners of this place are about as fun as humanly possible, there's a sandwich on the menu called The Yahtzee. When you're finished with your meal, a server delivers dice to your table on a tray. If you get a Yahtzee in three rolls, you can shout YAHTZEE! super loud and get your sandwich free of charge.

Ah! I miss the place already. 

From there, we wandered up to Lake Drive for a digestive respite. Le Bon Macaron was fine. The tea was fine, the atmosphere was fine. We didn't go for the macarons, so I can't speak to those. But after visiting The Electric Cheetah, something about the place left us feeling a little "meh." I probably wouldn't return unless I was really hankering for a place to sit down and drink tea pronto.

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Now that I'm spelling out this afternoon in Grand Rapids in writing, it sounds positively gluttonous, but I will press on regardless. From tea we walked next door to Brewery Vivant. Evidently, Grand Rapids has a CRAZY craft beer scene. There are microbreweries and pubs on every block, and the city has lovingly adopted the nickname "Beer City, USA." Founders is actually based out of Grand Rapids. Who knew, right?

Brewery Vivant piqued our interest for a few reasons. First, the beer reputation. Second, the food reputation. And third, the bar and dining area housed inside of an old chapel. The result is a warm, inviting neighborhood pub that just may be the grown-up (I mean, real?) version of the Great Hall in Harry Potter. Andrew and I both felt that we could've stayed there all day, eaten ourselves into blissful oblivion, and probably made a bunch of new friends amongst the local patrons.

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The menu was tempting on multiple counts. Since we had dinner reservations in a couple hours, we skipped the duck nachos, but obviously those would be worth a try! Instead, we opted for dessert and an appetizer from the seasonal menu: strawberry shortcake with grilled berries and a sweet biscuit, and the "bread and butter" platter with bone marrow herb butter, tart berry jam, and house-made spent grain bread.

Though the presentation left something to be desired, the food was excellent. I considered ordering a second round of strawberry shortcake because the biscuit was so tasty. And yep, you saw that right -- that's a photo of a demolished bread and butter plate, because again, too good to remember to photograph in advance. 

We also created our own beer flight, which allowed us to sample four of the brewery's finest. I loved the Tropical Saison, and Andrew, for some reason, was charmed by a limited seasonal release: rhe Blackberry Tart Side. Sours are definitely not my thing, but kudos to Vivant for pleasing my husband's selective palate.

We very nearly cancelled our dinner reservations and stayed put in the comfort of the hall, but our curiosity for dinner won out in the end. Keep doing your thing, Brewery Vivant. We'll definitely be back soon.

Grove is part of a Grand Rapids restaurant group called Essence that quickly rose to the top of our foodie dining list. Though the other restaurants were tempting, we elected to visit Grove because of a seasonally-inspired, creative American menu, and the option to order from a separate vegetarian menu was refreshing in that region. 

The flexibility of the menu was fun. We created our own tasting menu of smaller plates, sampling items from both the regular and vegetarian menus, and the resulting meal was a culinary adventure. We were both uncomfortably stuffed by the time we were done--to be expected with the food marathon we knowingly embarked upon--but we also finished the meal feeling immensely satisfied.

The vegetable carpaccio was appropriately light and refreshing for the hot outdoor temps. Yellow watermelon paired well with tomato tartare, ricotta vinaigrette, and herb tuille. Plus, the presentation was gorgeous. 

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The pea cheesecake was next, and it was the star of the show. Our waitress struggled to describe the dish when we asked about it, but after trying it, the dish title really is all you need. Imagine a savory cheesecake made from whipped pea puree and an everything bagel crust. It was unique, it was light, it was seasonal, and we loved everything about it. Perfection.

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From there, things got heavy. The duck egg raviolo was too tempting to ignore when perusing the menu, but unfortunately, the description was such that we weren't expecting it to be deep-fried. And deep-fried it was! Imagine a 3x5" ravioli deep-fried in duck fat, and then stuffed with a fried duck egg. Yummy? Of course. How could that not taste good? But it was also stupid and unnecessarily heavy. Why do so many chefs insist on frying things? Food tastes good without frying it. Cut it out, yo! I prefer to eat good stuff without destroying my insides.

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Alas, we ate the veggie hand pies with mushrooms after the duck egg raviolo, when we were just about ready to explode. That was a darn shame, too, because the hand pies were right up there with the pea cheescake. Presented with ramps, sauerkraut, maitake (mushroom) ketchup, and chili crema, this dish was surprising and packed a major flavor punch with every bite. Even after I felt that I could not possibly eat another bite of the hand pie itself, I couldn't refrain from eating sauerkraut smothered in the maitake ketchup and chili crema. The combination was absolutely genius. I mean, mushroom ketchup? Amazing.

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All in all, I wish we could have eaten in the East Hills neighborhood of Grand Rapids for an entire week. My belly limitations were irritating with such interesting and widespread culinary options laid out before us. Literally, all in one spot. Though we managed to cram three meals into six hours, we barely scratched the surface; we have yet to sample the goods at Cherie Inn, Furniture City Creamery, Maru Sushi, or the Green Well Gastropub, all on the same stinking block as Grove and Brewery Vivent! Man oh man. East Hills, you have captured my heart!

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Kudos, Michigan. You surprised us! In particular, Grand Rapids is a great spot for the beer connoisseurs and foodie adventurers our there. Gas and food prices were a tad high compared to St. Louis, but other than that, Western Michigan offers an affordable, fun vacation spot that can probably keep just about anyone happy. 

Stay tuned for upcoming travel reviews of New York City, Paris, Dijon, Strasbourg, and Lucerne. Cheers to "Do Everything Year"! 

Food Lover's Guide to St. Louis

Happy Tuesday, my sweet friends.

First of all, I want to take a moment and acknowledge the overwhelming responses to the recent post about my history of abuse. Your words of encouragement and support have been a balm to my soul, and your stories of similar treatment and pain have moved me to tears. It is good to celebrate healing and to challenge abuse in all of its forms--thank you for walking that path alongside me, and for being a part of the conversation.

As the holidays are upon us and I find myself frequently indulging in seasonal treats, food has been on the brain (and in the belly) a lot. This week, I thought it would be fun to share a lighter post about exploring the dining scene in St. Louis.

The love language of my marriage is literally eating together--a specialized category of quality time, in my opinion. We can consistently be observed in the middle of a fantastic meal, when I take a bite of something delicious, make eye contact with Andrew mid-bite, and tearfully exclaim, "I just love you so MUCH!" 

Weird? Probably. But we love our personal brand of weird.  

Because of our great love of food and dining, Andrew and I have surveyed many of the wonderful culinary establishments in the area, and frequently find ourselves in a position where we are delivering dining recommendations to others.

Even though we're self-declared experts of eating in our city, this was a difficult guide to approach. Should I organize it by neighborhood, each with its own colorful personality and emphasis, or by type of cuisine? In the interest of time and in an effort to avoid writing a full-fledged St. Louis dining guidebook, there are good restaurants missing, and attributes that I've failed to list. Nonetheless, for locals and out-of-town visitors alike, my hope is that this guide will introduce you to a new gem in the St. Louis dining world, and that you will enjoy a bite of something scrumptious with a friend, family member, or foxy date. 

A few disclaimers:

  1. I do not claim to be the definitive expert on dining in St. Louis -- the guide below is purely opinion and experience-based. There are still many great St. Louis restaurants we have yet to visit. No need to get saucy about your neglected favorites or despised inclusions!

  2. I do not eat everything. You will find no steakhouses on this list, nor will you find many meat-centric options.

  3. I value ambiance, service, and experience in addition to the quality of food offered. For example, especially in the fine dining category, if the service is overly stuffy, I generally don't remember the experience fondly. I appreciate it when servers are willing to smile, or heaven forbid laugh. Some fancier restaurants are not listed as a result.

Now that those warnings are taken care of...

Move over, Ian Froeb! Without further ado, I am proud to present...

The Food Lover's Guide to St. Louis

Here it is, my friends. My St. Louis favorites are below, divided into the following categories:

  • Sweets and Beverages -- there may be "real" food, but the treats are best

  • Ultra-Casual -- sweatpants permitted without substantial judgment

  • Casual-Classy -- no-fuss date night, jeans-friendly

  • Special Occasion -- get fancy and celebrate

Sweets and Beverages

Clementine's Naughty & Nice Creamery

Neighborhood: Lafayette Square and DeMun
Claim to fame: All-natural homemade ice cream, in boozy and regular varieties

Hannah's Take: Clementine's brings some seriously delicious competition to the ice cream scene in St. Louis. The creative concoctions--boozy ("naughty") and regular ("nice")--are made with the best ingredients, and no artificial crap, including dyes. In addition to their ice cream, they make their own whipped cream and waffle cones/bowls in house. Ice cream lovers, rejoice!

Nathaniel Reid Bakery

Neighborhood: East Kirkwood
Claim to fame: Internationally-acclaimed croissants, pastries, and happiness.

Hannah's Take: If you don't know who Nathaniel Reid is, you're going to thank me soon. This award-winning pastry chef won some serious accolades for his delectable, gorgeous treats, then decided to open an unassuming little strip-mall bakery in East Kirkwood. Go for literally anything that screams your name from the irresistibly gorgeous counter case, but don't miss the croissants. 

The London Tea Room

Neighborhood: Tower Grove South
Claim to fame: A rockin' loose-leaf tea selection in a decidedly English setting. 

Hannah's Take: An accessible, bright English tea shop actually owned and operated by honest-to-goodness Brits. The loose leaf tea selection is unparalleled in St. Louis--visit for a casual pot of tea in the storefront seating area, or book a reservation for high tea in the more formal dining room. Pastries, quiche, and lighter fare available. 

Gelateria Del Leone

Neighborhood: South Grand
Claim to fame: Thoughtful hot beverages and the creamiest gelato on earth.

Hannah's Take: Don't be fooled by the name--the Gelateria offers much more than delicious, creamy gelato. In addition to an impressive pastry selection, be sure to try a hot beverage. My order is always a London Fog--steamed milk, Earl Gray tea from the nearby London Tea Room, and a hint of vanilla. In good weather, the patio is divine.

The Cup

Neighborhood: Central West End
Claim to fame: Great cupcakes, and the world's best buttercream frosting

Hannah's Take: Seriously, the buttercream frosting is to die for. There are seasonal, rotating, and standard cupcake flavors available, and none will disappoint. The Cup has even been crowned as the official cupcake of the St. Louis Cardinals--what more do you need to know? They've even added delivery service. You don't even have to leave the house, so your excuses not to try The Cup are down to zero. 

Handcrafted by Bissinger's

Neighborhood: Central West End
Claim to fame: Handmade chocolates including caramels, truffles, and creams--oh my!

Hannah's Take: Though they've recently expanded to a full cafe menu in the Central West End, the chocolate is still what shines the most. Try a truffle, caramel, and cream for a good sampling, and don't miss the more expansive dine-in dessert menu offered exclusively in the evening.

Vincent Van Donut

Neighborhood: Clayton
Claim to fame: Inventive, delicious donuts

Hannah's Take: Only Clayton could house a donut shop with such flair. These uniquely square treats are ultra-decadent, and not for the feint of heart. Rumor has it that they also make homemade poptarts, but you have to get there crazy early to snag them! I have yet to try one. Instead, we go for regular donut varieties like the cookies and cream, or blueberry cheesecake.

Pint Size Bakery

Neighborhood: Northampton
Claim to fame: Seriously delicious, inventive, gorgeous baked goods.

Hannah's Take: Pint Size is a recent discovery for us, and Andrew and I are both obsessed. After reviewing their holiday goodies menu, we immediately texted Andrew's mom and said, "Umm, can we please bring dessert for Christmas?" So far, I'm convinced you can't go wrong here, but try the salted caramel croissant or a hand pie for a delectable treat!

Ultra-Casual

Andrew's Pizza Pick: Pi Pizzeria

Neighborhood: Multiple including The Loop, Kirkwood, Downtown, Central West End
Claim to fame: Pizza nested in a deep-dish cornmeal crust.

Hannah's Take: I don't really understand everyone's obsession with Pi. That might have something to do with the fact that it took me several years to try it out, and people raved about it constantly until I finally tried it. I was underwhelmed, but Andrew still insists that Pi is his favorite pizza in town. Give it a try and decide for yourself!

Hannah's Pizza Pick: Blackthorn Pub

Neighborhood: Tower Gove South
Claim to fame: A pizza on top of a pizza, with the city's best sauce.

Hannah's Take: Blackthorn Pub is definitely the weird uncle of the STL pizza scene. It's a dive bar in Tower Grove South, with dollar bills taped all over the walls and ceilings. They have one oven, limited pizza toppings, and less-than-awesome customer service. But the pizza sauce is perfectly balanced with just the right amount of heat, and the pie is essentially a pizza on top of another pizza--double cheese, double toppings. Call ahead--wait times can exceed an hour, but the pizza is worth the effort. 

Pho Long

Neighborhood: Olivette
Claim to fame: Pho, the Vietnamese noodle soup you never knew you needed.

Hannah's Take: If you've never tried pho, you are missing out! Enjoy a warm, flavorful, satisfying noodle soup with varieties for every diet. If you're like us and tend to be more flexible in your restrictions, try our personal favorite: the vegetarian pho with tofu, swapping in the beef broth from the classic house pho. 

Colleen's Cookies

Neighborhood: Clayton
Claim to fame: Baked goodies and an impressive menu in a neighborhood cafe setting.

Hannah's Take: Colleen's is an absolute gem. Their baked goods selection is overwhelming, but you can't go wrong no matter what you choose. The cafe menu has expanded over the years, offering a great--albeit random--selection of breakfast and lunch items, including some wonderful homemade biscuits. There's some patio seating out front, and the staff are all warm and welcoming. You'll feel right at home!

Salt + Smoke

Neighborhood: The Loop and Southhampton
Claim to fame: Texas-style BBQ and thoughtful sides.

Hannah's Take: The trashed wings alone are worth a stop at Salt + Smoke. I can't attest to many of the center stage meat options, but this BBQ joint definitely knows its stuff. Don't miss the surprisingly inventive side dishes, like the white cheddar cracker mac. 

Sweet Art

Neighborhood: Shaw
Claim to fame: Vegetarian and vegan fare, including bakery goodies.

Hannah's Take: I'm 150,000% certain that Sweet Art makes the most flavorful, amazing veggie burger that I will ever eat in my life. Try the "Make it Funky" for an extra good survey of what they have to offer. The kale salad is a worthy and surprising compliment to the main entrees, and no stop is complete without a cupcake--vegan or regular. Breakfast is good, too. Everything is good. Just go. 

Like Home

Neighborhood: Grand Center/SLU
Claim to fame: French cuisine made by actual French people!

Hannah's Take: If you aren't charmed by this place, there is simply no hope for you. Run by a young French woman and her mother, this cafe offers fresh, quality French dishes and pastries in an adorably homey corner cafe. Mind the operating hours--the schedule can change seasonally. 

Zen Thai & Japanese Cuisine

Neighborhood: Crestwood
Claim to fame: Cheap, authentic Thai food with bonus sushi.

Hannah's Take: Tucked back in a strip mall with Aldi, this hole-in-the-wall restaurant is easy to miss. During my undergrad, a Thai professor brought our class to this restaurant for an authentic Thai food experience. You simply will not believe how good the lunch deals are on weekdays, but even outside of those times, the food is reasonably priced and well-prepared. 

The Mud House

Neighborhood: Cherokee
Claim to fame: Hipster-friendly cafe fare that doesn't disappoint.

Hannah's Take: The Mud House is bittersweet for me because it's so excruciatingly busy on the weekends, but still absolutely worth a visit. Go during the week if your schedule allows. Breakfast and lunch dishes are consistently fantastic, as are the beverages and baked goods. If you can snag a table in nice weather, the back patio is glorious. Don't miss the chocolate chip cookie, my favorite in the entire city (thus far)!

Seoul Taco

Neighborhood: The Loop, and wherever the food truck is
Claim to fame: Korean-Mexican fusion, on the cheap.

Hannah's Take: My first experience with Seoul Taco was their food truck--I had a taco, and it was not super noteworthy. I later visited and ordered a chicken burrito, and I have been singing the praises of Seoul Taco ever since. Don't underestimate the heat, or overlook the restaurant for the simplicity of the menu. A cheap, delicious burrito awaits! 

Benton Park Cafe

Neighborhood: Benton Park (duh)
Claim to fame: All-day breakfast and diner-style fare, except way better.

Hannah's Take: Also excruciatingly busy on the weekends--especially in the AM--Benton Park Cafe offers diner-style American fare that is a step-up from your average diner. The food maintains the fatty-indulgence of a traditional diner (ie: the McGrittl This, a pancake sandwich with eggs and sausage in the middle), but with some quality alternatives and good ingredients. Don't miss the breakfast potatoes, best enjoyed with a little sriracha or hot sauce.

Kounter Kulture

Neighborhood: Northampton
Claim to fame: Carry-out spot with incredible Asian-inspired fare. 

Hannah's Take: Another recent find for us, Kounter Kulture is a delightful surprise. They offer no indoor seating, but what they do offer is an outrageously yummy take on sweet buns--basically a gigantic taco wrapped in a massive sweet bun, filled to the brim with slow-roasted pork, tofu, or spiced catfish. There's other stuff on the menu, but why would you not order a sweet bun taco?!? The service is incredible, especially given that this is just a carry-out joint. You will not be disappointed. 

Casual-Classy

Taste

Neighborhood: Central West End
Claim to fame: Craft cocktails and delectable small bites.

Hannah's Take: When you mostly want a craft cocktail but also want some quality small plates, Taste is the place for you. Everything that Gerard Craft touches turns to culinary gold, so have no fear--for the non-locals, just take my word on this one. 

The Fountain on Locust

Neighborhood: Midtown/Grand Center
Claim to fame: Ice cream and soda fountain in a hand-painted art deco setting. 

Hannah's Take: The specialty ice creams desserts are well-known, but the food is just as delicious at this Midtown gem. Try the dill pickle soup for something unique and, frankly, magical. Obviously don't skip dessert--the ice cream is sourced from a dairy in Wisconsin, the only one known to age their ice cream. All toppings and sauces are made in-house.

Element

Neighborhood: Lafayette Square
Claim to fame: New American fare with a killer view of downtown.

Hannah's Take: We've visited Element several times, and the food seems to improve with every visit. The setting, of course, is impossible to beat--enjoy a rooftop bar overlooking downtown St. Louis. While you're there, check out the view of Climb So Ill, the city's go-to rock climbing gym housed in the same building. 

Prasino

Neighborhood: St. Charles
Claim to fame: Actually delicious food, west of 270. 

Hannah's Take: If you suddenly find yourself west of 270 and surrounded by fast-casual chain restaurants, don't panic! Prasino in St. Charles provides a welcome relief from the tragic, far-west county dining scene. Offering "craft New American cuisine," lunch and dinner at Prasino are great, but brunch is the real standout. Don't miss the truffled potatoes!

Russell's on Macklind

Neighborhood: Southhampton
Claim to fame: Neighborhood favorite with stellar local fare. 

Hannah's Take: Whether it's a breakfast pizza, gooey butter cake, pulled pork sandwich, or a simple salad and sandwich combo, Russell's knows how to dish out good food. They get crazy on the weekends, and the patio fills up fast in good weather, but this neighborhood favorite is still well worth your time. 

Cafe Osage

Neighborhood: Central West End/Fountain Park
Claim to fame: Farm-to-table fare, right in the heart of the city.

Hannah's Take: Hungry for some home-grown goodness in the midst of the city? Look no further than Cafe Osage, a combination garden store and cafe. They grow many of their ingredients on site, and the freshness is evident in both the breakfast and lunch menus. For the best experience, come when the weather is nice and enjoy a thoughtfully prepared meal al fresco. 

Small Batch

Neighborhood: Grand Center
Claim to fame: All-vegetarian fare, and a massive whiskey selection. 

Hannah's Take: Vegetarians rejoice! You can eat everything on this menu, and the flavors are anything but bland. Known for an impressive whiskey selection, this member of the Bailey's family is also a welcome addition to the St. Louis food scene. Small Batch is a great stop for a pre-show dinner in Grand Center. 

Whitebox Eatery

Neighborhood: Clayton
Claim to fame: Counter-service cafe with a pinch of sophistication.

Hannah's Take: Every time my mom is in town, she says, "Oh, maybe just a soup/salad/sandwich place?" And every time she asks, I rack my brain trying to come up with a place. Fortunately, I can turn to this surprising little cafe in downtown Clayton. Order at the counter, and enjoy quality food with refreshing service attention. Brunch is especially good. 

Avenue

Neighborhood: Clayton
Claim to fame: European cafe with a rock-star staff.

Hannah's Take: A little piece of Europe tucked away in downtown Clayton, Avenue is the stop for anyone used to the quality food and service found in overseas dining. Weekend brunch is excellent, and they've managed to hire the best servers in town for an enjoyable experience at breakfast, lunch, dinner, or brunch. Ask to sit in Becky's section, and visit John behind the bar. 
 

Special Occasion

Bar Les Freres

Neighborhood: Clayton
Reservations: Probably a good idea.
Claim to fame: The best French restaurant in STL.

Hannah's Take: If you've got a pretty lady you're looking to impress, this is the all-around best date stop in the city. Start to finish, the experience is exquisite--excellent cocktails, incredible French food, attentive service, and a quiet, romantic setting. If you're calling for a reservation and get persistent busy signals, keep trying--they often leave the phone off the hook on accident. Don't worry, they'll make up for the minor annoyance at dinner!

Stone Soup Cottage

Neighborhood: Cottleville, MO (40 minutes northwest)
Reservations: Definitely, probably a month or more in advance.
Claim to fame: Incredible farm-sourced tasting menu in a charming setting.

Hannah's Take: Not for the feint of heart, Stone Soup Cottage offers the ultimate fine dining experience in the St. Louis area. Dinners are hosted on a farm in Cottleville about 40 minutes northwest of the city, in the romantic dining room of a charming farmhouse. The service is exquisite, and the tasting menu is an experience you don't want to miss. The worst part is driving back to the city afterward--consider booking a nearby room for the night instead!

Claverach Farms

Neighborhood: 20 miles west of STL
Reservations: Definitely, probably a month or more in advance.
Claim to fame: Farm-sourced, family-style experience in an open-air barn.

Hannah's Take: I like to think of Claverach as a less-intimidating, family-style Stone Soup. Dinners are held in an open-air barn on the farm about twenty miles west of St. Louis. Best experienced with a group, enjoy a seated dinner at long picnic tables featuring the freshest seasonal ingredients from the farm. 

Sidney Street Cafe

Neighborhood: Benton Park
Reservations: Probably a good idea, but drop-ins have a fighting chance.
Claim to fame: Inventive New American in the ideal date-night setting.

Hannah's Take: The exposed brick and street lamps in the main dining room of Sidney Street Cafe combine beautifully to create a charming, romantic, laid-back date night setting. Ask to be seating in that main room, and enjoy a fantastic meal with someone special!

Brasserie

Neighborhood: Central West End
Reservations: Probably a good idea, but drop-ins have a fighting chance.
Claim to fame: Excellent French fare, and a procrastination-friendly brunch.

Hannah's Take: Another of Gerard Craft's victories, Brasserie is a French stop in the Central West End, now offering lunch during the week in addition to dinner, and brunch on the weekends. The patio is spacious, and if dinner is a little too intimidating for you, go for brunch. The croque madame and benedict are both marvelous, as are the breakfast potatoes. Unlike many of the area brunch stops, you have a chance for a table if you show up sans reservation around 10:00 AM.

Herbie's

Neighborhood: Clayton (formerly Central West End)
Reservations: They have gobs of space--you're probably fine without one.
Claim to fame: French-inspired American fare with quality service. 

Hannah's Take: The recent move from the Central West End to downtown Clayton makes sense for Herbie's. This fine dining spot now boasts a massive patio, and the neighborhood suits the sophistication of the menu, service, and ambiance. While arguably less inventive and more traditional, the food is well prepared, and the service is excellent. 


Honorable Mentions

Vicia

Neighborhood: The Cortex
Reservations: Definitely, though not too far in advance.
Claim to fame: Vegetable-forward fare that is turning heads on a national level. 

Hannah's Take: I had to include Vicia, because absolutely everyone is talking about it! We have yet to visit, but are excited to give it a go in January. For a preview of a similar philosophy, watch the Chef's Table episode about Blue Hill. The team behind Vicia spent several years with Blue Hill, and the philosophy is noticeably similar.

Pieces Board Game Bar & Cafe

Neighborhood: Soulard
Claim to fame: Super fun board game cafe with better-than-expected fare. 

Hannah's Take: Go for the games, stay for the food! This innovative board game bar and cafe is thriving, right next to the farmer's market in Soulard. For a $5 game fee, play as many games as you like for as long as you'd like. For every food or beverage item you order, they'll deduct $1 off your game fee. The food is better than expected, and the service is fantastic. Basically, Pieces is heaven for foodie nerds. Get your geek on!

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And that's a wrap! I'll try to update this guide and re-post it periodically, when we've visited new favorites. In the meantime, I hope I've left you drooling for something listed above. I'd love to hear your thoughts if you try any of these places out, and if there is something not listed that you think I should try, drop a suggestion in the comments below.

Updated: January 22, 2018

Adventures in Chicago

Holy crap, was this trip overdue! Andrew and I get travel bugs pretty frequently (especially Andrew), and we were itching to get away and explore a new place long before we actually left. Thankfully, Chicago was lovely, and we had several adventures worth noting.

Transportation: Amtrak
In the name of simplicity and foregoing the outrageous parking fees in the city, we took the train from St. Louis to Chicago. In theory, this is a great idea. Somebody else does the driving, while you kick back and watch movies or read or whatever. The El system in Chicago is sufficient enough to get around with a car, so it was a no-brainer.

Next time, I think we'll stick to driving. The train travels ridiculously slowly, stops all the time, and is not even close to comfortable. Seriously, I'm not generally picky about seats, and I was uncomfortable immediately. It's a bad sign when you're wishing for an airplane seat. We also had minor delays in both directions, and did not disembark in pleasant moods. 

Lodging: Airbnb
This was our fourth or fifth experience with Airbnb, and to be honest, it feels a little too hit and miss for my taste. The Gold Coast studio met our needs, but felt a little cramped for two. You may have a completely different opinion, but when I'm on vacation, I want to be away from familiar home adulting like dishes and laundry. It just isn't the same when you've got to clean up after yourself regularly. 

That being said, the studio was super convenient to the El system, and was in a bustling area with plenty of shops and restaurants in walking distance.

Museum Campus: Shedd Aquarium and the Field Museum
On our first full day in the city, we went full-out tourist and visited the museum campus. Our first stop was Shedd Aquarium

Guys, we are total suckers for aquariums. I have no idea what it is...I don't even particularly like ocean life, and have a 100% irrational fear of whales. Granted, there were no (big) whales at Shedd, but it's still not the sort of place I should logically like to spend my time. Perhaps the mystery of an ecosystem we can barely begin to fathom is mesmerizing enough to captivate my attention, anyway. 

Regardless, we had a blast at Shedd! We spent a solid 2.5-3 hours there, including lunch in a cafe. The shark exhibit was particularly impressive, though the aquatic show left a lot to be desired. The aquarium is definitely worth a stop if you're considering it for your next Chicago trip.

After Shedd, we walked over to the Field MuseumThis was Andrew's pick, and admittedly more his niche than mine. The Hall of Gems was shiny and pretty, and the ticketing person let us in to the Tattoo exhibit for free, which was amazing. But overall, I just felt exhausted by the vastness of the place, and weirded out by the taxidermy animals. I think you'll know if you're into this sort of thing just by glancing over the website exhibit descriptions. 

Deep Dish: Lou Malnati's
Okay...pizza is a controversial topic in St. Louis, and I'm guessing it's the same in Chicago. I did a good amount of restaurant research heading into our trip, since Andrew and I are huge foodies. We wanted to get some locally-loved deep dish, and there was a resounding web presence of delight over Lou Malnati's. We had a location in walking distance from our studio, and checked it out that evening. 

HUGE disappointment.

Granted, we have a crap-ton of good pizza in St. Louis: Dewey's, Blackthorn Pub, Pi, PW, Randolfi's, Katie's, just to name a few off the top of my head. But I expected a lot more than the chewy cheese, greasy pepperoni, and dry, flavorless butter crust that we were served. I'm suspicious that this may be more akin to the "native" pizza choice, a la Imo's in St. Louis (which is an abomination and disgrace to all pizza). When we came home a few days later, we immediately ordered takeout from Blackthorn Pub in the deep-dish style just to make ourselves feel better about pizza in general.  

I even took a picture, just for you, so that you could admire Blackthorn's creation. Their sauce is what really makes the pizza (it's got just the right amount of heat), but it's also a double-decker slice: crust, cheese, toppings, crust, cheese, THEN final toppings. If you're ever in St. Louis, check it out. There is no website, and it's the definition of a dive bar. Your pizza will take a solid 45-60 minutes to cook, because they only have one oven, and somebody is likely going to be rude to you. But it is worth every precious minute of your time. 

Fancy Dinner: El Ideas
Food is the love language of our marriage...literally, we bond by eating incredible food. Mid-bite, we'll give each other googly eyes and say, "Damn. I love you and I love eating with you." It's nerdy, but it's us, and we embrace it when we travel.

El Ideas was our fancy dinner choice for this Chicago trip, and it was not an easy decision. There were a lot of other competitors, and quite frankly, this option was hella expensive. But the concept was exactly up our alley: "to make fine dining cuisine and service approachable and fun instead of pretentious and stuffy." That alone would have sold me on this place, as it really is about the full experience for us; fine food just doesn't taste as good if your waiter has his nose in the air and refuses to crack a smile.

Our experience at El Ideas was worth every penny. They really stuck to their mission--the atmosphere was casual and accessible, the kitchen open for conversations with the staff. We even ate our first course without utensils or fingers, literally licking it off the plate as directed by the kitchen staff. What better way to start a meal that you're not supposed to take too seriously?

We sat at the "Front Row" seats in the kitchen, which I probably wouldn't spring for next time, but gave us full access to the kitchen crew for the entirety of the meal. All of the staff members were hilarious, easy-going, and attentive. 

And the food... ohhhhh the food.

Everything was divine. Literally, everything, and that includes the lamb tongue which...I mean, its a cute little lamb's tongue. I shouldn't have been able to swallow that with any sort of happy feelings, but I definitely enjoyed it.

My favorite course was a play on the Wendy's frosty/french fry combo. They made a potato and leek soup with some extra crispy french fry bits mixed in, and then put some liquid-nitrogen-frozen ice cream/whipped cream on the top in a sundae dish. The entire thing smoked when you ate it, but the flavor combination was incredible. I could have eaten ten of those with nothing else and been completely content. 

At the end (following our 2.5 desserts), they offered coffee and tea service in the kitchen, and gave us printed menus to take home as a memento. Andrew and I have had some incredible meals, historically, but this definitely made the Top 3. Check out El Ideas in Chicago if you've got some cash to spare and delight in well-prepared, accessible food. 

Lyric Opera of Chicago: My Fair Lady
Our final evening in Chicago was up in the air until about 2:30 PM on Saturday. We'd entered the Hamilton lottery three times, and lost three times. True to my nature as a romantic, I sincerely believed we'd actually get tickets because we had a whopping 3 opportunities...hahahahha. We didn't, and my soul was a little crushed. 

However, this disappointment led to a spontaneous visit to the Lyric Opera of ChicagoThey offer 50%-off rush tickets the day-of a performance, so we got cheap seats in the second balcony and figured, what the heck? I have worked with Opera Theatre of St. Louis locally on many occasions, and am comfortable with opera as a result, but I'd never seen My Fair Lady on stage before, certainly not produced by an opera company. 

It was a fabulous production! If you've never braved an opera performance before, these "crossover" musical theatre opportunities are a great way to check it out. And honestly, the performances are going to be significantly better at an opera company than they will be at a touring musical theatre house. Be brave! 

The rest of our time in Chicago was spent meandering around various neighborhoods, exploring. That's the way we prefer to experience a new city...but honestly, three days of activity weren't enough at all. We will definitely find ourselves back in the Windy City for future adventures.